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New ceo for hartz: the future looks bright

New ceo for hartz: the future looks bright!

The former chief executive of India’s largest steel producer Hindustan Iron & Steel has resigned due to health concerns and has been replaced by Jai Kumar, who has joined Google, Bloomberg reported.

“For reasons of health and time, I have retired from the Chief Executive’s role,” said Kumar, a native of Kerala and a native of India. He added: “I would like to express my gratitude to Google for having been able to work with me for the last five years, both on my company and my personal side.

“I am grateful for all the time the Google business and my fellow employees shared with me during the past five years,” Kumar added.

Hartz, which once ran into problems wit퇴폐 마사지h workers at its mills in the state of Madhya Pradesh following the deaths of an ironworker and his son following protests from union activists, is the largest steel producer in India with an iron content of approximately 250 pounds.

In recent years, it has faced mounting opposition from labour unions, environmental groups, and politicians in its home state. Earlier this year, a judge ruled that it must give workers up to a two-year layoff to avoid being forced to pay tax.

After the ruling, the company also lost the right to appeal the ruling against it, a ruling it will continue appealing.

The announcement comes as Hindustan Iron and Steel (HIT) is in the midst of an모나코 카지노 expansion push. In November, a company executive said the firm has plans to expand to new plant sites in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Kerala.

One of its latest expansions is in India’s West Bengal State, 속초안마with a new factory site set to start operations this year and another one expected to open at a later date.

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Rudd plays down double dissolution talk, saying it was ‘not that difficult’

Rudd plays down double dissolution talk, saying it was ‘not that difficult’

The Australian Financial Review’s Michael Morgan asked Rudd if he supported a double dissolution election after he said it wouldn’t be in Australia’s best interests to elect a new PM unless the opposition party was split and the government was unable to form a majority.

“I think the thing that we should be concerned about, I’m in favour of not doing a double dissolution. It might be the best way of dealing with it because we shouldn’t have a two-party system,” the Rudd leader repliexo카지노d.

“I think the major question would be whether the opposition party would be able to form the majority. And that is very difficult to think about because we don’t know whether there is any possibility there will be an agreement at the beginning because, as we have seen over the last 24 hours, the government’s position and the coalition government’s position are both very different.

“But my sense is that there is not, nor is there currently, any possibility that we will not have a minority government if the government doesn’t form a majority.”

Rudd was clearly hoping his comments could provide an incentive for the two sides to sign a deal during this year’s election campaign. But it’s also become a problem for the Prime Minister with a number of Australians believing he’s being hypocritical and undermining the Australian people, in particul슬롯 머신ar those who voted for the Labor Party.

One reader of The Australian wrote: “This is exactly the same as what the PM said in Australia before, that the best way to deal with a new government is if everyone h실시간 바카라ad one. The PM’s not doing it. The PM’s saying, ‘We’ve got to have a two-party government, don’t you worry about it, don’t worry about our support if you don’t have a majority to form a new government’.”

‘The Australian’s Paul Kelly has more on the question of dual-parties’, in his ongoing ‘Australia and the Coalition’ series. Check back on Thursday as the series continues…

The Australian’s Andrew Bolt:

“In the absence of a change in government, it is hard to understand why the Turnbull Government would ever want to start negotiations over a new government. Why would they? The only reasonable reason they would forgo it is to create some kind of leverage which is not there.”

‘Labor MP Penny Wong has warned that a hung parliament in Australia could be a ‘catastrophe’: Paul Kelly, Sydney Morning Herald